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Boxing’s Best P4P in a Snapshot in Time

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  • Boxing’s Best P4P in a Snapshot in Time

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    By Ted Sares

    These days, more and more people seem to be living in the moment and that might be especially appropriate for boxing fans. Any list of so-called “best” fighters might have looked a certain way last week and then change tomorrow. However, today it just might look like this:

    1. Vasiliy “Hi-Tech” Lomachenko. Lightweight 11-1-0 (9 KOs): Lomachenko is an improved version of Floyd Mayweather Jr. He trains uniquely and does things in the ring seldom seen before. That’s why his nickname is “Hi-Tech.” Said Loma recently, “My father explained to me that money can end tomorrow, but with history they will not forget you. That’s why, for me, boxing is a sport and not a business.

    2. Saul "Canelo” Alvarez. Middleweight 50-1-2 (34 KOs):A grizzled veteran at a young age who does it all. His two close matches with Gennady Golovkin answered many questions, especially about his chin. And with his latest financial deal, he can afford all of the Kobe beef he wants.

    3. Terence “Bud” Crawford Jr. Welterweight 33-0-0 (24 KOs):Moving up quickly with spectacular and dramatic knockouts, he has an uncanny ability to read his opponent, adjust if required, and then take control of the fight. Many think he should be number one on the lists of best boxers.

    4. Gennady “GGG” Golovkin. Middleweight 38-1-1 (34 KOs):He came this close to beating Canelo twice, but must now step it up because his aura of invincibility has been pierced and Father Time lurks. A rematch with Daniel Jacobs would tell us all we need to know.

    5. Oleksandr Usyk. Cruiserweight 15-0-0 (11 KOs):Still another outstanding Ukrainian fighter with superb technical skills, but are they enough to allow him to compete with the heavyweights? The fact that Usyk as an amateur won a gold medal at the 2012 Olympics, as well as bronze and gold at the 2009 and 2011 World Championships, all in the heavyweight division, suggests that they might be.

    6. Mikey Garcia. Lightweight 39-0-0 (30 KOs):The complete package and quintessential boxer/puncher who relies on a mastery of the fundamentals to win and win and win. However, he must be careful of that dangerous inflection point where more money meets the risk of moving up in weight class.

    7. Errol “The Truth” Spence Jr. Welterweight 24-0-0 (21 KOs):Like Crawford, he has a mean streak once the bell rings and will beat his opponent’s body until he can close matters. He has remarkable athletic skills but his level of opposition seems to be a bit out of sync with the high praise. Time will tell sooner rather than later, but he is a heavy load.

    8. Naoya “Monster” Inoue.Bantamweight 16-0-0 (14 KOs):His nickname says it all. He really is a “monster.” A mini-Godzilla who ends fights upstairs and downstairs in highlight reel fashion. Kalle Sauerland, the German promoter, says, “I’m convinced he’s not only the number one power puncher in Japan, Asia or America, he’s the best on the planet”. That’s why he needs to showcase his stuff outside of Japan more often.

    9. Anthony “AJ” Joshua. Heavyweight 21-0-0 (20 KOs):Best of the big guys who exploits his opponents weaknesses and then closes like a thunder clap. He defends with aplomb and hits with asunder. He also holds three of the four major world heavyweight championship belts. To their credit, others are sorting things out by fighting each other in order to get a chance to fight AJ before 90,000 plus rabid fans at Wembley. AJ is an “event fighter.” When he fights, it’s a major event in the UK—and possibly even an opportunity for his opponents to earn an early retirement payday.

    10. Srisaket Sor Rungvisai. Junior Bantamweight 47-4-1 (41 KOs):The new “kid” on the block who gives every indication of sticking around for a while. He has won twenty straight and forty-six of his last forty-seven. He has duked in Japan (where he suffered three of his four defeats in the beginning of his career), Mexico, New York City, and Los Angeles. Look for this Thai to gain gravitas and big paydays as he beats more name opponents.

    Lists, by their very nature, are always subject to criticism and attack and this one is probably no exception. Manny Pacquiao fans will ask why he is not on the list and so will those who follow Russians Artur Beterbiev and Dimitry Bivol Ukrainian fans—at the risk of becoming somewhat greedy-- will want more representation in the form of the “Nail,” Oleksandr Gvozdyk, but first he must hammer dangerous Adonis Stevenson in December. Miguel Berchelt and Rey Vargas have Mexican aficionados cheering as does Leo Santa Cruz, while Carl Frampton gets raves in Ireland. Daniel Jacobs, Gervonta Davis, Jermell Charlo, Demetrius Andrade, and Keith Thurman have Americans piqued with interest and Callum Smith has suddenly hit the scene. Isaac Dogboe is the latest Ghanaian to attract notice. Finally, Thai minimum weight Wanheng Menayothin is 51-0 but he has not fought anyone of note. And oh, yes, Deontay Wilder is not exactly of the P4P type but his awkward style and incredible power could allow him to be on top of his own list.

    Ted Sares is one of the world’s oldest active full power lifters and Strongman competitors. He is a member of Ring 10, and Ring 4’s Boxing Hall of Fame. He also is an Auxiliary Member of the Boxing Writers Association of America (BWAA).

  • #2
    A Facebook post from Bernie Campbell: "Bernie Campbell Ive got actually no argument with this list." I also got 100% agreements from Joe Pasquale and Bea Williford. Facebook tends to cannibalize boxing sites. Also, Great writing n maybe even better observations. Best always, Ron Shreck.
    Last edited by Kid Blast; 11-05-2018, 03:12 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Good list, Ted. However, I don't think I'd have Alvarez at No. 2. But that's what lists are for -- debate.

      Comment


      • Kid Blast
        Kid Blast commented
        Editing a comment
        Where would you put him?

    • #4
      How can this be an accurate snapshot pound for pound list when you got Loma ahead of Usyk?

      Lomachenko currently has only 1 world title and even if Loma wins his next fight he will still have 2 less world titles in his division than Usyk.



      Furthermore, Loma has a loss on his record and Usyk (whom I recall previously you were uncertain of his ability) has none.

      Plus Usyk goes to his opponents backyard and defeats them as he unifies his titles.



      The criteria must be “perceived” skills over real achievements.

      Because based on achievements, win/losses, and unified/current world titles . . . .

      Usyk has better runs on the board than Loma.



      I hope this doesn’t mean I have to put my steel caps on again and start kicking some serious azz.




      Cheers,

      Storm.

       

      Comment


      • Kid Blast
        Kid Blast commented
        Editing a comment
        See below........

    • #5
      Here's how I have the current P4P Top Twelve:

      1. Canelo Alvarez
      2. Vasyl Lomachenko
      3. Gennady Golovkin
      4. Terence Crawford
      5. Mikey Garcia
      6. Srisaket Sor Rungvisai
      7. Anthony Joshua
      8. Oleksandr Usyk
      9. Leo Santa Cruz
      10. Errol Spence Jr.
      11. Naoya Inoue
      12. Eleider Alvarez

      Comment


      • #6
        What, if any, is your criteria for Loma over Usyk?


        Cheers,

        Storm.

        Comment


        • #7
          When I watch them fight, Loma looks better skilled; superior.

          Comment


          • Kid Blast
            Kid Blast commented
            Editing a comment
            Yessir.......

        • #8
          OK, so purely subjective then.

          As I expected.



          Still, no-one can deny (regardless of the fact he currently has less unified titles than Usyk as a professional fighter) Vasiliy is talented.

          Currently Usyk is beginning to look like someone that may be as good, if not better than, Holyfield.





          Cheers,

          Storm.

          Comment


          • Kid Blast
            Kid Blast commented
            Editing a comment
            No. Not purely subjective. Locations of fights. Armature records, Versatility. Corner. Level of opposition. Defensive skills. Offensive skills. KO power. Number of titles may or may not be credible. My opinion.

        • #9
          What is a P4P list but an exercise in subjectivity?

          Better than Evander Holyfield? That's interesting.

          Comment


          • Kid Blast
            Kid Blast commented
            Editing a comment
            That's extremely premature. Holy fought some of his very best fights as a heavyweight. Usyk had not fought as a heavyweight in the Pros. yet.

        • #10
          Originally posted by KO Digest View Post
          Here's how I have the current P4P Top Twelve:

          1. Canelo Alvarez
          2. Vasyl Lomachenko
          3. Gennady Golovkin
          4. Terence Crawford
          5. Mikey Garcia
          6. Srisaket Sor Rungvisai
          7. Anthony Joshua
          8. Oleksandr Usyk
          9. Leo Santa Cruz
          10. Errol Spence Jr.
          11. Naoya Inoue
          12. Eleider Alvarez
          This is also for Storm.

          That's a good list, Jeffrey. And I believe you could defend it pretty well. You have everyone I have-- I believe-- but in a different order. Generally, the difference between these guys is pretty thin. I see you have Usyk 8th while I have him 5th. I am no longer doubtful of him and think is a marvelous talent but I think Loma does some things that Usyk can't do just yet. nor can fellow-Uke Oleksandr Gvozdyk. One is pivoting and then unleashing volleys and then pivoting again. Almost like a figure skater with a nasty disposition. He also figures out his opponents quickly, makes a fast adjustment, and then closes the show concussively. , The way he came back at Linares (no slouch) was amazing. Loma dazzles, Usyk doesn't' IMO. But is strongly suspect we will see more of a dazzle from Usyk soon, Remember, this is today. Oh yes, the Salido fight was a dirty one that the referee allowed. Over weight, Rabbit punches, and he was seconds from being waxed.

          When Loma fought Thai Suriya Tatakhun in 2014 in Macao, the Thai was 51-1. Loma was 2-1. Loma won by scores of 107-120 (thrice) Chonlatarn was down once in 4th after which Loma hurt one of his hands and fought the remaining 8 rounds with one hand and had the HBO Team hypnotized. Max almost popped. Loma did everything but KO the guy---with one hand. That's what I mean by him being unique.

          As for fighting at his opponent's home, I believe Loma fights at neutral locations. home, Like MSG and in Nevada and Cal. That's where the money is and that's why he makes far more than his fellow Ukrainian who until recently fought most of his bouts in Kiev. .Loma also fight at the appropriate weight and is counseled by an incredibly savvy TEAM. The difference between my top 5 is razor thin but I kind of like the way it looks.

          Comment


          • #11
            Originally posted by KO Digest View Post
            What is a P4P list but an exercise in subjectivity?

            Better than Evander Holyfield? That's interesting.
            Well , you can apply some standards and/or criteria as RING Mag does

            They are difficult, but without coming off as a braggart (because that's hardly my intention), This is one of the best I have ever composed. I was very comfortable hitting the send button on this one.

            Comment


            • #12
              We're all undisputed heavyweight champions of our own opinion.

              Comment


              • Kid Blast
                Kid Blast commented
                Editing a comment
                No. I have lost a few up on the platform. But I'm still trying. It's about persevering and believing in your self and in your knowledge of a particular subject. Keep things simple; don't over-intellectualize of over-analyze. Just do your best.

            • #13
              Originally posted by KO Digest View Post
              What is a P4P list but an exercise in subjectivity?

              Better than Evander Holyfield? That's interesting.

              Yep, (even aside from his superior amateur record) check where Evander was at the same stage of his career as Usyk.

              Currently Usyk is beginning to look like someone that may be as good, if not better than, Holyfield.



              Pound for pound lists, whilst usually to some extent subjective also usually apply some standards beyond pure subjectivity.

              In addition to that small degree of subjectivity they usually (in my experience/opinion) are based on current/past achievements.

              Otherwise, how can 1 fighter from 1 division truly be considered to be the equal of another in a separate division (essentially the definition of the pound for pound list); if - as is the case between Loma and Usyk - he has not currently achieved even half of the other?



              Bert Sugar would be appalled.




              Cheers,

              Storm.

               

              Comment


              • #14
                Speaking for the dead, that's subjective too right?

                Comment


                • #15
                  Usyk is 15-0, yes?

                  By comparison:

                  Holyfield had already beaten a future Hall of Famer.

                  Over 15 rounds.

                  Usyk may well get waxed by Tony Bellew.

                  That would render the comparison ridiculously moot.

                  Comment

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