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  • Lomachenko-Pedraza and More

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    By Thomas Hauser

    Boxing returned to the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden on December 1. Vasyl Lomachenko vs. Jose Pedraza in the main event drew a sellout crowd of 5,312. The non-televised undercard was respectable. And the three-fight telecast that followed the Heisman Trophy presentation on ESPN had moments of drama.

    The first televised bout of the evening showcased Teofimo Lopez (10-0, 8 KOs), a 21-year-old lightweight who's rapidly moving from prospect to contender status. Mason Menard (34-3, 24 KOs) was Lopez's designated victim. All three of Menard's losses had been by knockout and this was expected to be the fourth "KO by" on his record.

    Lopez has all the confidence and arrogance of a young fighter with a big punch who's on the rise. It took him all of 44 seconds to blast Menard into oblivion.

    Next up, 24-year-old Isaac Dogboe (20-0, 14 KOs) sought to defend his WBO 122-pound title against Emanuel Navarrete (25-1, 22 KOs) of Mexico. Dogboe was born in Ghana but grew up in England. He claimed his belt with an eleventh-round stoppage of Jessie Magdaleno in April of this year and was considered a fighter who doesn't need protecting.

    Navarrete was fighting outside of Mexico for the first time, which is often a sign of a padded record.

    Dogboe entered the bout as a 7-to-1 betting favorite and mounted a two-fisted assault to the head and body in the first stanza. But Navarrete had come to fight and began landing shots of his own in round two, at which point Issaac's chin seemed a bit suspect. As the bout wore on, Dogboe did his best work on the inside. When he gave Navarrete room to punch, Emanuel obliged him.

    It was a spirited, back-and forth, action encounter that was even after eight rounds. Then Navarrete picked up the pace and won the final four frames going away. By the end, Dogboe's face was badly swollen; his left eye was almost shut; and he was trying simply to survive. He made it to the final bell but was dethroned by a 116-112, 116-112, 115-113 margin.

    Good fight, good decision.

    Lomachenko (11, 9 KOs) vs. Pedraza (25-1, 12 KOs) was promoted on the basis of both men having titles, which is a little like promoting a title-unification football game between the Big Ten and Ivy League champions.

    Lomachenko's ring prowess has been amply catalogued. Twelve of his professional bouts have been contested for world titles. He's an elite fighter while Pedraza is a good one. In match ups like that, the elite fighter almost always wins.

    Top Rank had planned to match Lomachenko (the WBO 135-pound champion) against Raymundo Beltran (the WBA beltholder) as part of an "immigrant-from-Mexico-gets-citizenship" feel-good story. But Pedraza upset the apple cart in August of this year by winning a unanimous-decision over Beltran.

    Lomachenko was returning to the ring after surgery to repair a torn labrum suffered in his right shoulder during a May 12 victory over Jorge Linares. Still, Vasyl was an early 12-to-1 favorite over Pedraza and the odds moved as high as 20-to-1 reflecting the fighters' respective ring skills.

    The crowd was highly-partisan in favor of Lomachenko. Fighters from Puerto Rico are rarely booed in New York during pre-fight introductions, but it happened here.

    It was an interesting exercise for boxing purists. The early rounds were tactically fought. Then Lomachenko figured out what he had to do to beat Pedraza down and did it. Many of the early rounds were close enough that the judges could have given them to whichever fighter they wanted to. But Lomachenko pulled away late, putting an exclamation mark on his performance with two eleventh-round knockdowns that came close to ending matters short of the 119-107, 117-112, 117-112 judges' verdict in his favor.

    Lomachenko looked a bit less "high tech" against Pedraza than he has in the past. He didn't exploit angles as effectively and control the range as well as in some of his earlier fights. Part of that was because Pedraza is fast on his feet and spent long portions of the evening jabbing and moving away. Another reason might be that Lomachenko's best fighting weight by his own evaluation is 130 pounds. There were times when he had trouble with Jorge Linares's height and reach when he fought Linares seven months ago. And that was true for stretches of time against the taller Pedraza. Mikey Garcia might be a bit too big for Lomachenko.

    Photo credit: Mikey Williams / Top Rank

    Thomas Hauser's new email address is thomashauserwriter@gmail.com. His most recent book – Protect Yourself at All Times– was published by the University of Arkansas Press. In 2004, the Boxing Writers Association of America honored Hauser with the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism.



  • #2
    He was still Hi-Tech in the sense that he waited for the right opportunity to test his shoulder and when it came, he attacked like a Pactard going after a Flomo. It was then that we saw pure brilliance. 41 straight shots. He is special,

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    • #3
      Loma's shoulder.

      It just went through surgery for a torn labrum.

      He might now never be as good as he once was.

      Does this performance reflect that or was Pedraza the issue?

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