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It’s About Time That Mayweather Flipped the Script, but Don’t Hold Your Breath

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  • It’s About Time That Mayweather Flipped the Script, but Don’t Hold Your Breath

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Floyd.jpg Views:	1 Size:	96.7 KB ID:	11040

    By Frank Lotierzo

    To the surprise of no one, former pound for pound king Floyd Mayweather is again becoming a staple of boxing news. The last time Floyd was in the ring was back in August of 2017 when he was for the most part toying with MMA star Conor McGregor by the time the fight/exhibition ended. Astonishingly, the McGregor clash actually counted on Mayweather's boxing record as his 50th consecutive win to give him a career record of 50-0 (27).

    Discussing Mayweather's place in history is a controversial subject when it comes to assessing where he ranks. And perhaps the year in which one was born plays the biggest role as to where one slots him among the greatest of the greats. The bellweather year is somewhere around 1978, meaning today you're 40 years old. Assuming that you became cognizant of boxing when you were about 13 years old, that means you started watching boxing closely around 1991. And since 1991 no fighter has remained on top longer than Mayweather starting with him fighting as an Olympian in 1996, winning his first title as a junior lightweight and then emerging into a full blown superstar after winning a split decision over Oscar De La Hoya in May of 2007.

    To those born after 1978, Mayweather is the only star fighter they never saw lose a bout. Therefore they truly see him as being unbeatable, in spite of many believing he lost his first meeting with Jose Luis Castillo before beating him conclusively when they met in a rematch. But Floyd isn't the only great or near-great who won a controversial decision, so you better believe the fans who grew up during his prime can easily justify him as being one of the all-time greats.

    The conversation when it comes to Mayweather's all-time pound for pound rank is dramatically different to hardcore boxing fans born before say 1970. In their opinion, who you fought and beat and when you fought them, assuming the opponent was at or near his prime, carries significantly more clout than being undefeated.......especially when, as they see it, Floyd fought most of his marquee opponents when he was at or near his best and they were clearly on the decline.

    Floyd has some impressive names on his resume. The best fighter he beat during his career who was both outstanding and in his prime while also undefeated was the late Diego Corrales. After stopping Corrales in January of 2001, Floyd defeated other really good fighters. However, of the signature names on his record, namely Oscar De La Hoya, Juan Manuel Marquez, Shane Mosley, Miguel Cotto, Canelo Alvarez and Manny Pacquiao, the only one that was undefeated when Mayweather fought him was Alvarez, but the issue there is Canelo hadn't yet fully flowered into the more complete and hardened fighter that he'd end up being, and Mayweather forced him down to a catch-weight of 152 for a junior middleweight title bout, two pounds lighter than he'd been in two years while he was still filling out physically. And if you don't think two-pounds is a big deal, than why did Floyd insist on it? Although I don't think it changed the result, Canelo was without a doubt compromised.

    As for De La Hoya, he'd only fought once in three years after being stopped by Bernard Hopkins and had been defeated four times entering the fight with Mayweather, and all four defeats were more convincing than Floyd's showing against him. In regard to Marquez, if you would have applauded Sugar Ray Leonard for torching Alexis Arguello if they had fought, then you can add that win to the Corrales column. But I can't laud Mayweather for beating Marquez due to him being the pronounced bigger man. Then he defeated a shopworn Shane Mosley who came closer to knocking Mayweather out than any other fighter he was ever in the ring with. But is winning a decision over Shane so impressive in 2010? Mosley had already lost five times and, at the same weight he fought Mayweather, he was defeated much more handily, twice, by the late Vernon Forrest eight years earlier in 2002.

    Perhaps one of Mayweather's most thrilling fights was against Miguel Cotto in 2012. Again, Cotto, who competed well, entered the fight having previously been stopped and dominated by Antonio Margarito and Manny Pacquiao in 2008 and 2009. Once again Floyd fought a fighter who, although very determined and not washed up, wasn't at his best and after fighting Mayweather, Cotto picked his opponents as judiciously as Mayweather had through the last 15 years of his career. Lastly, Mayweather won a dull but convincing decision over Manny Pacquiao, who started boxing as a flyweight, was five or six years past his prime and two-and-a-half years earlier had been knocked out cold by one punch by Marquez.

    The content above is not an opinion or a theory; it's the reality of the situations pertaining to those bouts. But as is the case when discussing Mayweather, I'll be excoriated by his fans and applauded by those who don't care for him....I get it. But the facts don't lie and that's why those of us born before 1970 aren't blown away by Mayweather's resume and five titles. What we are blown away by is how he stayed in great shape for 20-plus years, evolved as a fighter and studied the intricacies of boxing and mastered defense....nothing can shade that.

    However, Floyd and some of his fans insist he's the "GOAT" and that's an unfunny joke. In an honest assessment, Mayweather has made a strong case that he's among the top-50 pound for pound boxers ever. Had he defeated a stylistic nightmare like Paul Williams, instead of retiring briefly just to avoid fighting him, his case would be stronger. Antonio Margarito tried to face Mayweather before he lost his title to Williams, and was ignored by Floyd and his team. And that was because Mayweather knew Antonio's physicality, style and toughness was more work than he was willing to sign on for.....and that mindset and management enabled Floyd to remain undefeated.

    In all likelihood, Floyd is going to fight again and his opponent will either be a top MMA fighter or Manny Pacquiao, two automatic wins that are just a money grab and really won’t enrich his legacy one iota.

    Since Floyd retired, two fighters have emerged fighting at the weight where he scored his biggest and most lucrative wins, and that's welterweight. Terence Crawford holds the WBO title and is 34-0 (25) and like Floyd won titles at 135, 140 and 147. Crawford is better than any welterweight Mayweather ever fought and stylistically he's even more versatile than Floyd, not to mention he's a better pound for pound puncher and he’s meaner. The other alpha fighter in the welterweight division is IBF titlist Errol Spence 24-0 (21). Spence, a southpaw, is a bigger puncher and more of a physical presence than any opponent Mayweather ever confronted. He's also extremely confident and applies immense mental and physical pressure. And like Crawford, Spence is in his prime and would more than welcome a fight with Mayweather for the obvious money it would net him.

    In a prime-for-prime match-up, I would favor both Terence and Errol to beat the Mayweather who defeated De La Hoya, Mosley and Pacquiao. And if they fought now they would both be favored over Mayweather, a moot point as it's apparent Floyd won't go near them.

    During Floyd's career he entered his fights with an advantage in one way or another over the best fighters he faced, something that wouldn't apply if he were to meet Crawford or Spence. And if he fought either of them and lost, neither Crawford nor Spence would get credit for beating him. Rather, it would be repeated over and over afterward how they didn't beat the best Mayweather and that would be correct. The only thing that would change is Mayweather would no longer be undefeated........but if he was competitive with either Crawford or Spence in a losing effort, it might be more impressive than any single victory he earned. And if he won, he'd have to be considered one of the greatest of the greats and nobody could dispute that regardless of their year of birth.

    For once it would be something to see Floyd Mayweather go into a fight when everything surrounding it didn't favor him. Mayweather losing to either Crawford or Spence in 2019 wouldn't hurt his legacy a bit; his detractors couldn't take relish in him losing at age 42. On the flip side, a win would be epic and off the chart and his legacy would never be questioned again!

    Between 1977 and 1982, Frank Lotierzo had over 50 fights in the middleweight division. He trained at Joe Frazier's gym in Philadelphia under the tutelage of the legendary George Benton. Before joining The Sweet Science his work appeared in several prominent newsstand and digital boxing magazines and he hosted "Toe-to-Toe" on ESPN Radio. Lotierzo can be contacted at GlovedFist@gmail.com

  • #2
    Another great title by Frank. I didn't even have to read the article---but I did anyway. And this paragraph says it all: "For once it would be something to see Floyd Mayweather go into a fight when everything surrounding it didn't favor him. Mayweather losing to either Crawford or Spence in 2019 wouldn't hurt his legacy a bit; his detractors couldn't take relish in him losing at age 42. On the flip side, a win would be epic and off the chart and his legacy would never be questioned again!?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Kid Blast View Post
      Another great title by Frank. I didn't even have to read the article---but I did anyway. And this paragraph says it all: "For once it would be something to see Floyd Mayweather go into a fight when everything surrounding it didn't favor him. Mayweather losing to either Crawford or Spence in 2019 wouldn't hurt his legacy a bit; his detractors couldn't take relish in him losing at age 42. On the flip side, a win would be epic and off the chart and his legacy would never be questioned again!?
      Thanks, Ted.

      Comment


      • Kid Blast
        Kid Blast commented
        Editing a comment
        Prego........

    • #4
      I actually just wish Mayweather would go away. But yeah, if he fought and defeated Spence or Crawford his legacy would be undeniable. That is not going to happen, though. Mayweather is TBB (The Best Businessman) and as such will take on the opponent that will make him the most money with least risk. Presumably, that will be the winner of Pacquiao-Broner (and l heavily favor Pacquiao) in May and then maybe another sideshow against an MMA fighter to finish things up once and for all.

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