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The Hauser Report: Caleb Plant is Making His Mark

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  • The Hauser Report: Caleb Plant is Making His Mark

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    By Thomas Hauser

    The July 20 IBF 168-pound title fight between Caleb Plant and Mike Lee wasn't expected to be competitive. But it was a coming out party for one of boxing's more compelling personalities.

    Plant was born and raised in Tennessee. As his ring career progressed, he moved to Henderson on the outskirts of Las Vegas to hone his craft. On January 13 of this year, he scored an upset decision victory over Jose Uzcategui to claim the IBF belt and bring his record to 18-0 with 10 KOs. Prior to that, his hardscrabble origins had been scarred by tragedy.

    Plant grew up in a home where alcohol and drug abuse were common. His own daughter, Alia, was born with severe brain damage.

    "She had zero motor skills," Caleb recounted last year. "She couldn't sit up. She couldn't hold her head up. She couldn't lift her arm. She couldn't eat. She ate through a tube in her stomach. I didn't know if she was gonna know who I was. I didn't know if she knew that I loved her. She was never gonna stand and say 'I love you, dad' or 'Merry Christmas, dad.' She's not gonna know what it's like to have friends. But what if I could just give her a nice life, a life that I didn't have. What if I could work so hard that I can give her a life and things that I never had as a kid. We won't be able to have the relationship that I had with my dad. But I'll give her my all, my best, no matter what. This is what I can try to give her. A roof over her head; food in her stomach even if it's not through her mouth."

    In 2015, at nineteen months of age, Alia was in the hospital on life support for the fifth and final time in her young life. Plant's words speak for themselves.

    "The doctors were telling me, 'Mr. Plant, your daughter is gonna pass away. That's a tough conversation to have. She was slowly going down and down and down and down. I went to her. It was just me, and I said, 'You know, this has been a long nineteen months, and I know you have to be tired. And if you are over this, then I'm okay with that. I'm not gonna be mad at you. I'm not gonna be disappointed in you. I'm not gonna be upset with you. If you're tired of this and you're done and you don't want to do this anymore, then your daddy supports you. And I'm gonna be right here.' And right after that conversation - a conversation that I had never had with her before because, every time before, it was 'No, this is not gonna happen' - she started going down. I said, 'I want you guys to take this stuff off of her because I don't want her to pass with these tubes down her throat and an EEG machine on her head and sticky and all that stuff.' They took all that stuff out. They cleaned her off and washed her hair. They took everything out. I got to sit there with her. She took her last breath at 10:55. And I just sat with her there for a long while."

    Adding to the tragedy in Plant's life, his mother was shot and killed by a police officer in March of this year. According to the Tennessee Bureau of investigation, Beth Plant was being taken to a hospital by ambulance when she became unruly and pulled a knife from her backpack. The driver pulled over to the side of the road and called for assistance from law enforcement. When a policeman arrived, Plant came toward him brandishing the knife and he shot her.

    After Plant's mother died, Caleb posted a message on Facebook that read, "Love you forever and always momma. You always said 'work hard bubba' and I did. I know that we spent a lot of time wishing the relationship we had was different but you was still my momma. We both wished we could start from scratch so we could go back and you could have a fresh start with me and Maddie. Regardless you was one of the sweetest ladies I've ever come across. You had your demons but you'd give the shoes off your feet and your last dollar to someone who needed it less than you. I love you momma and I know you are up there with Alia now and her and grandma finally get to spend time together like we talked about way back. You are the first one out of all of us to see what Alia is really like so make the most of that and kiss her up and tell her that her daddy loves and misses her. I know in the end it's your demons we always talked about that got the best of you. Maybe you always told me because you knew I'd understand because we shared some of the same ones."

    The saving grace in Plant's life has been boxing.

    "I've been boxing since I was nine years old," Caleb says. "There ain't never been a Plan B. Not to go to college. Not to get a nine-to-five. Not to get a job. Not to be in the NFL. Not any of that. All I've ever had is boxing. I'm from the metho-heroin capital of the U.S. where a mother will sell her child's last toy for one Xanex. Where a mother will lock her son and her daughter in a room for hours, not taking care of them, just so she can be locked away in her room doing her own stuff. I'm from where the Bethesda Center gives out-of-date canned food to you because you ain't got no food. There ain't no Plan B."

    Elaborating on that theme during a July 1 media conference call, Plant declared, "Boxing has always been like a sanctuary for me. It's been a place that I could go and be somebody. As a kid, I was somebody that nobody would want to be, living in a place where nobody would want to be in. When I got to go to the gym, then I got to be somebody that everybody wanted to be. Grown men looking up to me, oohing and ahhing. And once I got back out of those doors, I had to go back to being that kid that nobody wanted to be. So that became like an addiction for me, to want to be there, want to be in the gym."

    "Through everything that came and left in my life," Plant continued. "Through all the things that I've lost, through all the things I've been deprived of or haven't had, boxing has always stood by my side. Boxing has always been there for me through thick and thin. Boxing is like a woman. If you treat her right and you do good by her, then she'll stand by you and she'll do right by you. But she's a jealous woman. And the difference between me and my opponent is, I haven't glanced off of her. I haven't endeavored into other things."

    Mike Lee comes from a world that Caleb Plant is unfamiliar with.

    Lee went to high school at the Benet Academy in Lisle, Illinois. Virtually all of Benet's students go on to college. Lee spent a year at the University of Missouri before transferring to Notre Dame, where he graduated with a degree in finance. "I relax by watching CNBC," he told writer Kieran Mulvaney several years ago. "And I like reading the Wall Street Journal."

    For most of Lee's ring career, he was well marketed and well protected by Top Rank. At one point, he parlayed his Notre Dame pedigree into a much-commented-upon Subway commercial. Recently, he left Top Rank to campaign under the Premier Boxing Champions banner. Now 32 (five years older than Plant), he came into Saturday night's fight with a 21-0 (11 KOs) record and had fought his entire career at light-heavyweight or a shade higher.

    Plant's opposition had been suspect prior to his victory over Uzcategui. Lee's opposition had been worse. "The typical Mike Lee opponent," one matchmaker observed, "has had ten fights and won all but nine of them."

    Kick-off press conferences are usually characterized by the lack of anything eloquent being said. The May 21 press conference for Plant-Lee was different. Lee spoke first, voicing the usual platitudes.

    "Every single fight is different. I don't really care what his other opponents have done in or out of the ring. It doesn't matter. On fight night, the bell rings, it's just me and him. The best man will win. I've been in so many press conferences where opponents either talk **** or they're dismissive or they're respectful. I've beat them all. This is an incredible opportunity and I will make the most of it. I'm going to shock a lot of people"

    Then it was Plant's turn.

    "I've been boxing my whole life," Caleb said. "No college degree for me. No high school sports. No acting gigs. No Subway commercials. Just boxing, day in and day out, rain, sleet, or snow. He may have a financial degree. But in boxing I have a Ph.D and that's something he don't know anything about. Something else I have a Ph.D in is being cold and being hungry and being deprived, coming from very rock bottom. That's something he don't know anything about. So if this guy ever thought for one second that I would let him mess this up for me and send me back there; unlike him, I have everything to lose. This is how I keep a roof over my head and food in my belly. That's something he don't know anything about. So if he thinks he's going to mess this up for me, he's not half as educated as I thought he was."

    At times, the dialogue seemed to verge on class warfare. And it continued in that vein through fight week.

    "There are zoo lions and there are jungle lions," Plant said at the final pre-fight press conference two days before the bout. "The zoo lion will look at the jungle lion and think they're the same thing. And from a distance they look the same. Until it's time to eat or be eaten."

    "The trash talking goes back and forth," Lee responded. "That's as old as time. Nothing he's saying is new. It's all recycled stuff he's heard on TV or heard in movies. It's nothing new to me. It doesn't even bother me. I laugh at it."

    Plant-Lee was broadcast live on Fox as a lead-in to the Pacquiao-Thurman pay-per-view card. Lee was a 15-to-1 underdog. The consensus was that he had as much chance of beating Plant in a boxing match as Yale would have of beating Notre Dame in football.

    Nevada's choice of 76-year-old referee Robert Byrd as third man in the ring was a bit of a surprise. Byrd was once a capable referee, but his performance in recent years has been erratic. The most egregious example of this was his mishandling of the June 15 World Boxing Super Series cruiserweight semi-final bout between Mairis Briedis and Krzysztof Glowacki.

    Byrd is past the point where he can move nimbly around the ring and was out of position for much of Briedis-Glowacki. His judgment was also faulty. In round two while the fighters were in a clinch, Glowacki hit Breidis in the back of the head with a rabbit punch. Briedis retaliated by flagrantly smashing an elbow into Glowacki's face, driving the Pole to the canvas. In a post-fight in-the-ring interview on DAZN, Briedis acknowledged the foul, saying, "I did a little bit dirty."

    Glowacki, for his part, noted, "The elbow was really strong and clear to the chin. I did not know what happened. I do not remember a lot after that."

    Byrd deducted a point from Briedis but didn't give Glowacki additional time to recover. Still hurt, Glowacki was knocked down fifteen seconds later by a two-punch combination that ended with a right hand to the back of the head. He rose. The bell rang to end the round. And Byrd didn't hear it.

    "The bell's gone," DAZN blow-by-blow commentator Jim Rosenthal shouted. "They're carrying on. Come on, referee. I can hear it. Get in there."

    But Byrd allowed the action to continue. With people at ringside waving their arms and screaming at him that the round had ended, he allowed Briedis to batter Glowacki for another eight seconds until Mairis scored another knockdown.

    "He's gone down after the bell," Rosenthal proclaimed. "What is occurring in there? What is occurring? That bell was ringing for ages. It's farcical. He's saying he couldn't hear the bell. He must have been the only one in the arena."

    A badly damaged Glowacki was allowed out of his corner for round three but the fight was stopped twenty seconds later. In the same post-fight interview on DAZN, Briedis conceded that he'd heard the bell ending round two but kept punching.

    As for Plant-Lee, the fight lived down to expectations. Lee tried to fight aggressively but didn't have the tools to do it. Plant was the faster, stronger, tougher, better schooled fighter. He dropped Lee with a lead left hook late in round one, dug effectively to the body throughout, and put Lee on the canvas thrice more in the third stanza. After the final knockdown, Byrd stopped the mismatch. According to CompuBox, Lee landed just eight punches in the entire bout.

    It will be interesting to see how Plant progresses from here, in and out of the ring. In that regard, it should be noted that writer Jeremy Herriges talked at length recently with Carman Jean Briscoe-Lee (Alia's mother, who was once Caleb's companion). Thereafter, Herriges wrote a thought-provoking article for NY Fights that calls portions of Plant's narrative into question.

    https://nyfights.com/worldwide/a-mis...b-plant-story/



    Meanwhile, Caleb remains a work in progress.

    "I'm not a grown man," he said during a July 1 media conference call. "I'm a growing man. So I'm going to continue to become better in the ring. I'm going to continue to become a better man outside the ring. Thus far, I think I've done a good job of handling that responsibility. If I just continue to follow what I've done, I think I'll be on the right path."

    Let's see how the journey unfolds.

    Thomas Hauser's new email address is thomashauserwriter@gmail.com. His next book – A Dangerous Journey: Another Year Inside Boxing – will published this autumn by the University of Arkansas Press. In 2004, the Boxing Writers Association of America honored Hauser with the Nat Fleischer Award for career excellence in boxing journalism.

    Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel
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