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Logic in Boxing is an Oxymoron

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  • Logic in Boxing is an Oxymoron

    Click image for larger version  Name:	better.PNG Views:	1 Size:	299.3 KB ID:	16096

    By Ted Sares

    In 1996, David Tua KOed future world champion John Ruiz in 19 seconds with a left hook from hell. In 2002, he dispatched former world champion Michael Moorer in 30 seconds with an explosive straight right. A prime Tua was a heavy load for anyone.

    After losing to Chris Byrd in 2001, he went on an undefeated streak of 14 including the aforementioned blow-out of Moorer and a slaughter of countryman Shane Cameron, the Mountain Warrior, in a 2009 fight billed as the “Fight of the Century” in New Zealand. Tua came into the fight in the best shape of his career having lost a significant amount of weight.

    In the first round, Tua hurt and decked Cameron twice with a crushing and accurate attack and even hit him while he was on the canvas. He ended matters 20 seconds into round two with 13 consecutive heavy and accurate blows, all to Cameron’s head. This ending was not for the squeamish or faint of heart.

    After beating Friday Ahunanya, the “Terminator” was then held to an upset draw by a fading Monte “2Gunz” Barrett (34-9 coming in) in Atlantic City, NJ. It appeared that David’s great run was coming to an end, especially since Barrett came into the fight having lost six of his last nine.

    A year later in 2011, Barrett, now 40 years old, beat a sluggish Tua by a clear UD and in New Zealand no less. Tua lost for the first time since being out-classed by Chris Byrd 10 years earlier. Sadly, Tua also told the press that he was broke and homeless and that he was uncertain about his boxing future. He stepped aside from boxing with a myriad of personal issues including depression and a divorce.

    Meanwhile, Barrett was scheduled to fight Shane Cameron in July 2012 though he badly wanted a third fight with local hero Tua because he knew it would be a bigger draw. He also resented accusations that he had taken steroids (accusations that never panned out because of procedural irregularities).

    Monte was stung by these accusations and lashed out at Tua. “After I beat up on Shane,” he said, “I’m going to give Tua one more chance to whip his fat arse into shape and get his act together…For me, it’s that or nothing. I want David to take my last fight. After his wife finished pounding on him with their divorce I don’t know if he’ll have enough for me. I hope he will.”

    “David doesn’t do anyone proud,” continued the vengeful Barrett. “He’s an embarrassment to New Zealand. He’s a lazy, fat slob. He doesn’t apply himself. He can die a loser and never get a chance to redeem himself or be a man. The first fight his shoulder was hurt and the gloves were too big….The second fight he claimed I was taking steroids. What’s his excuse for the third fight? I know New Zealand wants to see it….He will probably make every excuse because he’s a coward. I used to have a lot of respect for David. But he doesn’t appreciate the status he has and realize the whole country is behind him.”

    Shane Cameron, meanwhile, seemed to be lost in the shuffle, but he remained Monte Barrett’s stepping stone to a lucrative payday. Barrett, a resident of Bayonne, New Jersey, would be risking the WBO Asia and WBO Oriental heavyweight belts that he won when he defeated David Tua, belts formerly held by Cameron.

    Barrett vs. Cameron

    Cameron won the first three rounds which were uneventful. Early in the fourth, both threw monster right hands simultaneously. Cameron’s got there first, rendering 2Gunz unconscious and producing a very scary moment for everyone at ringside.

    This frightening result afformed that Monte had been shot for some time but further certified that David Tua was even more shot. And yet, Tua was able to crush Cameron who in turn crushed Monte Barrett.

    Go figure. There was absolutely no logic in what transpired here.

    Many more examples would follow. Ricardo Mayorga, for example, scored two wins over Vernon Forrest who owned two wins over Shane Mosley, but Mosley KOed Mayorga twice. Expecting logic to exist in boxing is something one does at his or her peril.

    Ted Sares can be reached at tedsares@roadrunner.com

    Check out more boxing news on video at The Boxing Channel

  • #2
    Jim Lampley says via email:"Styles make fights. The only explanation"

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      John Howard says: "Tua vs. Ibeabuchi was one hell of a heavyweight fight! The two combined to throw a total of 1,730 punches -- unheard of in the heavyweight division!"

  • #3
    A prime Tua with Johnny Tango

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      Tango says: I saw Forrest lose to Mayorga at Pechanga Resort in Temecula, Calif.

  • #4
    Good read Ted. This brought back many memories.

    Funny story about Monte Barrett. He was scheduled to call the card at Turning Stone last June during Hall of Fame weekend headlined by Cletus Seldin and Zab Judah. However, he was nowhere to be seen as the event was about to begin. Randy Gordon, who was also calling the fight, came over to press row and asked if anyone wanted to step in until Barrett showed up. Ron Katz, who was the matchmaker for the card, then came over and said he would do so. Eventually, a few hours later, Barrett did show and did at the very least work the main event.

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      Good one. Monte is quite the dude. He lost to the Russian giant Valuev and I was concerned for his life before that one was stopped His last fight was a loss to another Russian giant, Ustinov. Ironically, Tua also lost to Ustinov in his last fight. Makes a great trivia question. I also recall when he KOd Ty Fields in the first round.

  • #5
    There is no logic in boxing you’re right Ted.

    I’m overwhelmed with a vision of boxing’s future. It’s a lot like professional wrestling. There was a time when that was a genuine athletic competition with winners and losers but it became easier and more profitable to sell a simulation of the sport rather the reality of sweaty bloody technical grappling. That can be boring at times. So too can boxing be. Wrestling became raslin with the introduction of and emphasis on showmanship and storylines. Boxing is already heading in that direction. “Remember when boxing used to be real,” they’ll ask.

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      God forbid, but you may well be right.“Remember when boxing used to be real,”

  • #6
    Boxing is too lucrative to allow boxers (and organic in-ring results) to determine its ultimate fate. It’s also too dangerous, and as a result it destroys the very excellence it displays.

    That’s not a cost effective way of doing business. As real fans of the sweet science become more and more of an endangered species there will be less and less reason to cater to them with high quality best vs. best matchups. The new boxing fan watches fights on YouTube or on their phone featuring entertainers and internet sensations. Today the sport is in the early “showcase” stage but I fear it will someday be in the choreographed stage where nobody would even recognize a real boxing match if one accidentally broke out. I’m not hopeful for the sport’s future.

    As sports entertainment.

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      I left the TV when that Jake Paul farce came on and did not bother to wait around for Andrade. Paul was God awful but the imbecile he was fighting (The Beast from the East) was challenged.

  • #7
    Great article Ted. The trilogy of fights between Emile Griffith, Dick Tiger and Rubin Carter is an amazing example of styles. Here Carter takes down Griffith in one round in Dec 63 knocking him down twice, we trained to specifically hurt him to the body first, I was in Carter's camp from beginning to end for that one and the whole strategy was to get Emile angry so he would throw boxing to the winds and come in and trade. Then Griffith gets two decisions over Tiger one for the title April 66, albeit a controversial 15 round decision, then a non title 10 rounder when Tiger and him were even older. Then before that in May 65 Tiger knocks down Carter twice in the 2nd round and once in the 4th and dominates to win a unanimous decision. P.S. Here at 2 Tua fights I refereed. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q7lUWG8erFY

    Comment


    • Kid Blast
      Kid Blast commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you Ron. Much appreciated. You gave a perfect example..................
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